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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a slightly tweaked message, the hopi changey thing that used to be the province of obama. >> i think this is a clever turn for him and i'm surprised he didn't start hitting it earlier because the obama brand of hope and change was so strong. like you said it, the way sarah palin said it, that hopi changey thing, he really reminded us that that wa what's obama promised. gwen: when i covered him, he campaigned and did defeat an income befpblet you can't just run on change though if you're the guy with the job
's a consequential difference. they know that president obama is going to increase taxes, where, where governor romney is not if he's elected president. that's an important issue distinction. coming into the last debate, the annenberg survey showed that the public thought that governor romney was more likely to take the country into a war, than was president obama. but the public also believed that president obama had gone around the world apologizing. now in the last debate, governor romney reassured that he was not as likely to take people into war as they had thought in that debate. and i think that was a calculated strategy on his part. now, you could say, "and it was illegitimate. you secretly know that he was more likely." but nonetheless, what we can measure is whether they get what he said he was going to do in the context. and i think that president obama responded to the apologizing around the world claim in a number of ways that were effective as well. and i think one of the things that we can say about debates making a difference is that, had there been debates in the goldwater/john
evening. so this is it. the obama campaign says it's winning. the romney campaign says it's winning and to be quite honest we can't tell you whoa's right but tonight we'll lie out the choices. mitt romney looking presidential in a blue suit and teleprompter told thousands of supporters, the next four days count. >> the only things that stand between us in some of the best years we've known is lack of leadership. and that's why we have elections after off. this tuesday is the moment to look into the future and imagine what we can do, to put the past four years behind us and start building a new future. >> and barack obama looking presidential yesterday in a bomber jacket in air force one saying romney is not worth the risk. >> after four years as president, you know me by now. you may not agree with every decision i've made. you may be frustrated at the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. you know i'm willing to make tough decisions even when they're not politically convenient. >> let's start by assessing these closing arguments. john, "you know me by
encounter with president obama and he went to a town called sayerville where he went door to door meeting with the people who came out to talk to him, shake hands. he was bolstering their spirits but in some cases there were people who broke down in his arms and cried and he became more than the chief executive of this state, he became the consoleer in chief, if you will. and that is a story that repeated itself a number of times later in the day. the governor and president obama took a helicopter ride over the area from atlantic city down to an area where the governor had told people to get off and in many cases they didn't and he kind of jokingly but firmly let them know when they were speaking a couple minutes after the video you're seeing right now, he let them know he was not happy with them but he'd give them a break this time around. but it's just a very, very kind of like -- this is a -- you know it's not a big state geographically but it's a very densely populated state and very diverse when it comes to geography as well. the highlands took a tremendous hit because that's where t
the popular vote by one point and obama wins ohio and iowa by one point that is possible, maybe a one or two-point shift but there is almost no way to look at the history of this country or try to do the more complex things, the mathematical models unlikely to have romney win the popular and have him lose the electorial college. >> rose: the sites and sounds of hurricane sandy, mark halperin and nate silver when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> hurricane sandy barreled through the northeast last night, the devastating impact was wide-ranging, cities and towns were hammered by the storm that left many without power and other vital resources. here are some of the sights and sound of the storm as scene on cbs this morning. we knew this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> it is underas
finally see the scale of sandy's wrath. president obama flies into the worst hit area, new jersey. >> we are here for you. we will not forget, we will follow up and make sure that you get all of the help you need until you rebuild. >> china is the country on the rise but could at the growing wealth crap slow it down? we continue our special report. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we are going to be here for the long haul. that is what president obama promised people in new jersey. he flew into the region of the coast. more than 50 people were killed in the storm, millions are still without electricity. >> leadership and a crisis, that is what america demands of a president six days before the election, this was barack obama's chance to show it. he traveled to new jersey, the state that was in the eye of the superstore, to see the damage. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet whose lives have been up and it, my second message is, we are here for you. we will not forget, we will follow up to make sure that you get all the he
for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he took the job's numbers as support for the central plank of his campaign, but the u.s. economy has failed to recover. >> he said he was going to
how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candidates' lives when they were young men. political journalists and authors will join gwen ifill on the "washington week" set to discuss how the presidency has transformed many of the men who have won it. and jeff greenfield of "need to know" will weigh in on this question: how can we predict which candidates will become successful presidents? but we begin with a look at the most pressing problems facing the nation today
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama hailed another month of job growth, while mitt romney cited an up-tick in the unemployment rate as proof of an economic standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5%
relief supplies and president obama went to the headquarters of the red cross. >> ifill: in his second story about targeting voters online, harry veen veen goes to ohio where the campaigns have positions forming digital armies. >> sreenivasan: it's an endless feedback loop channeling data back to the campaigns for them to learn even more about it and refine their pitches further. it's the campaign strategy of the future. >> woodruff: and a battle ground dispatch from nevada. mitch fox of the las vegas pbs reports on a tight contest in a newly created congressional district. >> reporter: the complexities of this race read like a novel. money, aggressionive attacks. a famous family name. even a potential bankruptciy looming. it's all playing out in a district that covers half the state. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound
's capital followed suit, shutting down public transportation, schools, and federal offices. president obama canceled a campaign rally in florida and flew back to washington, appearing early this afternoon to promise federal help. >> i'm extraordinarily grateful for the cooperation of our state and local officials. the conversations that i've had with all the governors indicate that at this point there are no unmet needs. i think everybody is taking this very seriously. we've got... prepositioned all the resources that we need. but right now the key is to make sure that the public is following instructions. keep in mind that for folks who are not following instructions, if you are not evacuating when you've been asked to evacuate, you're putting first responders at danger. >> ifill: on sunday things seemed less urgent for some, taking pictures at ocean city maryland. but by this afternoon, waves were pounding that beach. governor martin o'malley warned of much worse. >> we are ordering and urging all marylanders to stay off the roads for next 36 hours. there are very dangerous conditions out
of climate change, either, by this administration. >> that is true. certainly the obama administration has put forward a carbon tax plan early in the administration, but that ended up floundering in congress -- put forward a carbon cap plan. he has done other things in terms of increasing auto fuel efficiency, things in terms of back door, policies, but he clearly has not taken on this problem the way he had promised to back in 2008. >> you have written about the need for more research into climate change so that we can understand where these storms come from, but also more comprehensive response from america in terms of dealing with its infrastructure. we have seen the infrastructure problems caused by hurricane sandy. >> that is clearly true. you have 3.7 million americans who live within just a few feet of high tide. those are the people who are always vulnerable when you have a big storm like this one. you have new york city youth -- losing huge parts of its infrastructure, losing electrical service, losing subways because they were flooded. it is not just a matter of trying to prepare
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown reports on the battle of the ground game, hard fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
. mitt romney canceled his events for two days. barack obama returned to the white house. >> the center of the storm is going to hit landfall sometime this evening, but because of the nature of this storm, we are certain that this is going to be a slow-moving process through a wide swath of the country and millions of people are going to be affected. >> the holbrooke family are leaving nothing to chance as they prepare for the storm to do its worse. >> if we get a lot of water in the back yard it could lap over so we're going to sandbag that when we're done filling the up water here. we have a ton of food upstairs. most of it is nonperishable. if the refrigerator goes out we can eat for days. >> thousands of flights have been canceled, creating chaos for travelers. this family is from cornwall, making their first visit to new york, now won't be able to know when they'll get home. >> it was nothing on the radar when we left home. also the concern of delays going home later in the week. i think, yes, this is really quite anxious. we'd rather come at a different time. >> this is a once in
it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look at the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but interestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes demographic information and the unemployment information doesn't always sync up. >> tom: timing is everything in terms of synching up for whoever wins next week and what party is in control of alcohol because they'll seemi
race. just a week out from election day cannot -- election day, president obama was at a red cross center today and he will assess the damage tomorrow. a rally in ohio for mitt romney turned into a storm relief drive. i am joined in astin -- austin, texas by matthew doud. i have been speaking to you from both campaigns today. no one wanted to play politics with this storm, but we are a week away from election day and they are both thinking about how this will affect them. >> the first thing it does is freeze the rates where it was before this storm happen. a slight advantage for mitt romney on the popular vote, and a slight advantage for the president to on the electoral college. you cannot really assess this until we get through this. and it will not be until this weekend where we see the impact of this. my inclination is that if the president can be president and not a candidate in the midst of this, he may see some small bump out of this. because the american public will see him acting as president, and that is always an advantage for an incumbent. >> and we have been seeing him
for disaster relief efforts. at the white house today, president obama said officials are ready. >> there's been extraordinarily close coordination between state, federal, and local governments. and so we're confident that the assets are prepositioned for an effective response in the aftermath of the storm. r david paulison knows about mobilizing the federal government's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacting several states from dc all the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of respons
are working none stop to help life return to normal. president obama joined governor chris christie earlier in the day to survey the damage to new jersey's coast. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet on this block and thought new jersey, throughout the region whose lives have been upended, my second message is we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow, and you see that, and the president has seen that today, in the eyes and faces of a lot of the folks he's met, and that sorrow is appropriate. we suffered some loss. luckily we haven't suffered that much loss of life, and we thank god for that. but we have suffered losses, and this is the worst storm that i've seen if my lifetime in this state but we cannot permit that sorrow to replaces the resilience they know all new jerseyans have. >> rose: after andrew cuomo of new york early today completed touring the region. he shared his impressions while discussing th
that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's nearly impossible to know how extensive the damage will be or how long the cleanup will last. sylvia hall, nbr, washington. >> tom: earlier, susie mentioned the challenges of getting around one of the world's largest and most congested cities with no public transportation. city buses began rolling on new york streets at 5:00 p.m. eastern time today, but only partial service and on a reduced schedule. we have more on the work ahead to get new york moving again with erika miller. >> reporter: in new york city, the subway is a lifeline. the transportation network is the center of culture and commerce. more than four million people a day go thro
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)